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Infinitely Virtual Deploys Hitachi VSP G600 for Cloud Hosting

| August 18, 2016 | Reply

iLaying down sub-millisecond storage performance as a new marker for midrange cloud hosting, leading Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider Infinitely Virtual today announced that it has begun implementing Hitachi’s Virtual Storage Platform (VSP) G600, a breakthrough, rack-mountable storage system acknowledged as the industry’s fastest.

Infinitely Virtual is currently migrating customers served by its Los Angeles and Boston data centers, with full deployment expected by the end of 2016.  The Hitachi VSP G600 delivers up to four million IOPS (input/output operations per second) of flash­-accelerated performance, responds in less than 1 millisecond for 99.6 percent of transactions, and automatically maximizes performance in real time with Hitachi Dynamic Tiering active flash.  According to industry analyst Technavio, flash-based NAS storage arrays offer 40-45 times better performance than hard disk I/O performance.

“Our move underscores the primacy of high-speed storage in overall infrastructure performance,” said Adam Stern, founder and CEO, Infinitely Virtual.  “We believe that if providers aren’t delivering storage performance at this level, they simply aren’t delivering.  Storage infrastructure too often cannot keep pace with today’s demands, which is why we’re moving aggressively to offer new solutions that provide substantially better performance, IT efficiency and reliability.  To meet future demands, these solutions will lay the foundation for a software-defined infrastructure that has the agility to quickly adapt as demand grows and shifts.”

The Hitachi VSP family of flash-accelerated storage systems offers the ultimate in enterprise storage technology.  In addition to delivering up to four million IOPS, the Hitachi Virtual Storage Platform G600 supports up to 255PB (petabytes) of storage and the industry’s only 100 percent data availability guarantee.

Powered by Hitachi Storage Virtualization Operating System (SVOS), the G600 delivers best-in-class, flash-accelerated scalability, simplified management and advanced data protection that eliminates downtime.  VSP systems also include up to eight times greater memory cache, two times more connectivity and four times more cores than the previous generation.  These improvements result in up to four times greater performance, including the lowest response time in the industry.

The Hitachi VSP G600 consists of a 4U controller that includes the controller but no disk drives; drives are supported using drive trays connected to the controller.  The G600 supports 64GB of high-speed memory cache, arranged as 32GB per controller.

Hitachi Accelerated Flash (HAF) combines the flash optimizations of SVOS and its new patented flash module drives (FMD DC2), to deliver best-in-class performance and efficiency for hybrid and all-flash VSP systems.  For hybrid systems, HAF software provides automated, active-flash tiering that monitors and moves data to flash in real time, so you can be more responsive to sudden changes in workloads and deliver an “all-flash” experience.

HAF delivers increased real application performance at lower latency.  It improves efficiency with inline compression and ensures a higher resiliency than other offerings. FMD DC2 uses specially designed flash modules that are up to five times faster than off-the-shelf solid-state disks (SSDs), so applications run faster and are less likely to slow down even as workload I/O increases.  FMD DC2 embedded ASIC enables accelerated data compression that runs 10 times faster than competitive offerings, freeing up system resources so that more hosts and applications can be supported. Compared to most solid-state systems, it also offers greater total system capacity of up to 8PB effective capacity.

“The industry hasn’t done an adequate job equipping business users with the vocabulary they need to understand storage speed,” Stern said.  “The key is latency: as StorageSwiss puts it, how long it takes for a single data request to be received and the right data found and accessed from the storage media.  The norm used to be storage latency of 5 milliseconds – now, it’s 1 to 2 ms latency across the board.  And that’s not even fast enough.  Sub-millisecond performance is here – and users need to start asking their providers for that kind of capability.  Before long, if providers aren’t hitting sub-ms latency, they won’t even be in the ballpark.”

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